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Trumpet players

Posted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 1:45 am
by mindlink
Hi!

I'm a trumpet player and a huge fan of Lennie Tristano, and I would love to know which trumpet players who studied with Lennie. Could anyone please help me? I know Don Ferrara, and I also heard that Tony Fruscella took lessons with him, but that's it.

Thanks!

Re: Trumpet players

Posted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 3:26 am
by BulaMusliyevich
Warne Marsh started playing saxophone with the Hollywood canteen kids when he was thirteen, and Ben Webster and Tex Beneke were among his first idols. His studying and performing with Lennie Tristano from 1946 through 1952 and alter reunions shaped his musical thinking to which he was remarkably true throughout his life.

Re: Trumpet players

Posted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 5:23 am
by SupyanKorgay
Trumpeter and flugelhorn player Art Farmer started out playing bop with Horace Silver, Sonny Rollins, Gerry Mulligan and Gigi Gryce throughout the '50s, but the warm toned Farmer later branched out beyond bop. Since he was versed in various styles, he was hired by arrangers like George Russell and Quincy Jones. Farmer co-led the Jazztet in 1959, and with tenor man Benny Golson, and the band's 1960 release Meet the Jazztet was a brilliant disc. As a leader, Farmer released some great albums, including 1963's Live at the Half-Note, which also features guitarist Jim Hall.

Re: Trumpet players

Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 10:55 pm
by arooj
The perfect List of contrafact melodies,,,,Ablution, An Oscar for Treadwell, Apple Jump, Back Home in Brooklyn with Donna, visit here for more info en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_jazz_contrafacts

Re: Trumpet players

Posted: Sat Oct 31, 2015 12:37 am
by kathleenrueb
My ambition was to become trumpet player. But it is difficult to get some theoretical notes on this subject. I found some tutorial as well as essays from writing services. Hope that sources would help to get some deep theoretical knowledge along with some practical knowledge.

Re: Trumpet players

Posted: Tue Mar 01, 2016 2:45 am
by davidjohnson789
Tristano studied for bachelor's and master's degrees in music in Chicago before moving to New York City in 1946. He played with leading bebop musicians and formed his own small bands, which soon displayed some of his early interests – contrapuntal interaction of instruments, harmonic flexibility, and rhythmic complexity. His quintet in 1949 recorded the first free group improvisations. Tristano's innovations continued in 1951, with the first overdubbed, improvised jazz recordings, and two years later, when he recorded an atonal improvised solo piano piece that was based on the development of motifs rather than on harmonies. He developed further via polyrhythms and chromaticism into the 1960s, but was infrequently recorded.