Page 1 of 5

Dear Lennie

Posted: Sat Sep 09, 2006 2:59 am
by Marv Friedenn
Dear Lennie,
I was pissing in the sink when I saw in the mirror that one eye looks directly, the other askance. As if no sooner was I born than I was married.

Posted: Sat Sep 09, 2006 9:51 am
by B T
Yes, and before you know it ... it will be all over.

Might as well try to live life to the fullest!

B T

Posted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:17 pm
by Marv Friedenn
Dear BT,

I must turn this bad old world around before I can even begin to live life to the fullest. For instance, it turned a deaf ear to Lennie when Lennie was all I had. In return I intend to give it an earful.

Marv Friedenn

Re: Dear Lennie

Posted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 2:04 pm
by B T
Marv Friedenn wrote:Dear Lennie,
I was pissing in the sink when I saw in the mirror that one eye looks directly, the other askance. As if no sooner was I born than I was married.


Dear Marv,
Your support of LT's music is appreciated more than you could know. However, I don't think that pissing in the sink is the best way to get the world's attention.
Sincerely,
BT

Posted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 7:09 pm
by Marv Friedenn
Dear BT,

The brief poem presents a person displaying proletarian behavior who describes an insight he has just had about his dual personality to a dead jazz pianist with a reputation for elegance. I like the idea but I admit it's inappropriate for the web page.

Marv Friedenn

Posted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 5:51 am
by Marv Friedenn
Dear BT,
One more thing. So long as human suffering anywhere in the world is inflicted as a matter of policy, art for art's sake, which abstracts the artist from his or her environment and from what's happening in it, is a concession to the perpetrators of the suffering. Looking in a mirror and having an insight about oneself, while at the same time suppressing the motive for being there, is, for me, to sever the act of vision from the rest of the body. It's an art for art's sake of the eye. When I piss in the sink (where, by the way, one is more likely to find a mirror; besides, a mirror over the toilet would smack of pornography), I'm really pissing on art for art's sake.

I would have loved to discuss this with Lennie. I think we both would have benefitted.

Marv Friedenn

C'mon BT,

Posted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 4:56 am
by Marv Friedenn
you're supposed to ask whether in my opinion Lennie represents art for art or protest. That would give me the opportunity to answer that Lennie embodies both, because unless protest art is also for itself--as when Jimi Hendrix burns The Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock--it's politics not art. The source of Lennie's protest is clear. By deconstructing the show tunes that became jazz standards, Lennie deconstructs the fashionable world that produced not only them but also World War II and the A-bomb. Lennie's is a romantic protest against the failure of romanticism to save the world from destruction. Bela Bartok, whom Lennie admired, offers a similar critique using folk instead of show tunes. And whereas Bird demonstrates how to run rings around corporate society, Lennie has intimations of a world--worlds away from the world--that someday will replace it.

Marv Friedenn

Re: C'mon BT,

Posted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 6:27 pm
by B T
Marv Friedenn wrote:you're supposed to ask whether in my opinion Lennie represents art for art or protest. That would give me the opportunity to answer that Lennie embodies both, because unless protest art is also for itself--as when Jimi Hendrix burns The Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock--it's politics not art.

...

Lennie has intimations of a world--worlds away from the world--that someday will replace it.

Marv Friedenn


Dear MF,
This is the part that LT would be interested in discussing. He's not around to ask, but I feel that his art was strictly for the beauty of it. Great art transcends all the BS of this world (where it does seem that sometimes, "cream sinks to the bottom"). Any other motivations for creating it just go along for the ride ... and ultimately mean nothing when great art is experienced. And what do you know, you and I arrive at the same conclusion anyway, lets just say it like this: that great art "has intimations of a world--worlds away from the world--that someday will replace it."

(Its dangerous to give only one person (or a few "elites") the right to do that ... live and create profoundly.)

Of course he had his opinions re: "the world". Those were saved for the interviews, not the piano.

BT

PS You can look in the mirror without doing either of the activities you described. However, I suppose the relaxation that results from such does provide a stimulus for profound thought ...

Art for Art's sake vs. Art for protest

Posted: Mon Oct 02, 2006 4:20 pm
by B T
Marv Friedenn wrote:So long as human suffering anywhere in the world is inflicted as a matter of policy, art for art's sake, which abstracts the artist from his or her environment and from what's happening in it, is a concession to the perpetrators of the suffering.
...

When I piss in the sink ... I'm really pissing on art for art's sake.



When you piss on "art for art's sake", you are actually in collusion with the "perpetrators of suffering"! They have been doing this since the beginning of time! And you are pissing all over LT!

Take it away, Lennie ...


“You know, I have a little personal slogan of my own – I’m not interested in making history, I just want to play music.
“In the last 20 years a lot of musicians have got hung up with this idea that they are playing for posterity. For myself, I want to just sit down and play. If people like it, it makes me happy, if they don’t – well, I don’t consider myself a frustrated, unrequited artist. When I take a gig I have a ball playing.
“One of the great things about jazz is there is a lot of joy in it –in spite of what some people think. Some of our musicians are using jazz almost as you might use politics – as a weapon or a tool. I don’t feel that way.
“I don’t feel that you should put too much ego into music. If you feel angry with somebody you hit him on the nose – not try to play angry music.â€

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 8:00 am
by Marv Friedenn
Dear BT,

Our messages crossed. I'm replying here to an earlier response.

"Great Art transcends all the BS of this world," you write. "Any other motivations for creating it just go along for the ride." But BT, you seem unaware that Beauty's been in therapy for the last hundred years. The issue is that maybe it's time for her to return instead of transcend home. For Beauty armed--at all times and in all places however sordid--is perhaps preferable to Beauty armless even in the most supportive surroundings.

As for "motives going along for the ride," I answer with a parable. Beauty has a sister. Her name is Shitface. Beauty loves Shitface more than anyone in the world because Shitface ,who is also a goddess, is all she has. Anyone who follows Beauty home meets her sister. I've been told that if you love Beauty you had better love Shitface or Beauty will madden you.

Marv Friedenn